Top 150 Team GB Olympians

August 5, 2016

faceb link image
As you may be aware, Simon Jersey are official suppliers to Team GB, meaning we are all very excited for Rio 2016 to kick off on 5th August!

As we are now within 150 days until Rio 2016, we are counting down through the top 150 Olympians that have represented Great Britain.

1 – Chris Hoy
Sir Christopher Hoy, MBE, represented Great Britain at the Olympics and World Championships and Scotland at the Commonwealth Games.
Hoy is six-times an Olympic champion. With a total of seven Olympic medals, six gold and one silver. Hoy is the most decorated Olympic cyclist of all time. With his three gold medals in 2008 Summer Olympics, Hoy became Scotland’s most successful Olympian, the first British athlete to win three gold medals in a single Olympic Games since Henry Taylor in 1908, and the most successful Olympic cyclist of all time. After winning a further two gold medals (in the keirin and team sprint) at the 2012 Summer Olympics, Hoy has won more Olympic gold medals (six), and total medals (seven, tied with fellow cyclist Sir Bradley Wiggins) than any other British athlete.

2 – Steve Redgrave
Sir Steven Geoffrey Redgrave won gold medals at five consecutive Olympic Games from 1984 to 2000. He is regarded as one of Britain’s greatest-ever Olympians, the most successful male rower in Olympic history, and the only person to have won gold medals at five Olympic Games in an endurance sport. Immediately after winning the 1996 Olympic Gold Medal, he stated if anyone found him close to a rowing boat again they could shoot him. In 2000, he won his fifth consecutive Olympic Gold Medal and retired from the sport.

3 – Bradley Wiggins
Sir Bradley Marc Wiggins, began his cycling career on the track, but has made the transition to road cycling and is one of the few cyclists to gain significant elite level success in both those forms of professional cycling. He won a gold in the individual pursuit at the 2004 Olympic Games and two golds in the individual and team pursuit at the 2008 Olympic Games. After the 2008 Olympics, Wiggins took a break from the track to focus on the road. Initially viewed as a time trial specialist and as a rouleur, he showed his ability in stage races when he came fourth in the 2009 Tour de France. In 2012, Wiggins won the Paris–Nice, the Tour de Romandie, the Critérium du Dauphiné, and became the first British cyclist to win the Tour de France and the time trial at the Olympic Games.

4 – Ben Ainslie
Sir Charles Benedict Ainslie, best known as Ben Ainslie, is the most successful sailor in Olympic history, Ainslie has won medals at five consecutive Olympics from 1996–2012, including gold at the last four. He is the first person to win medals in five different Olympic Games in sailing, the third person to win five Olympic medals in that sport and also the second to win four gold medals, after Paul Elvstrøm. He was selected on 11 August 2012 to carry the flag for the Great Britain team at the London 2012 Olympics closing ceremony.

5 – Paul Radmilovic
Paolo Francesco Radmilovic represented Great Britain at four Summer Olympics. He won four Olympic titles in a 22-year Olympic career, a record which stood for a Great Britain Olympic athlete until broken by Sir Steve Redgrave when he won his fifth gold medal at Sydney in 2000. In 1928, he was the first person to compete for Britain at five Olympic Games, a record that would remain until surpassed by fencer Bill Hoskyns in 1976.

6 – Matthew Pinsent
In 1990, while still at Oxford, Sir Matthew Pinsent joined Steve Redgrave which marked the beginning of a long partnership. The pair won at the Olympic Games in 1992 and 1996.
In 2000 he won Olympic gold again as part of a coxless four with Redgrave, James Cracknell and Tim Foster. At the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, Pinsent’s fourth Olympic Games, Pinsent stroked the boat, with Cracknell, Ed Coode and Steve Williams. In a close race with world champions Canada, they again won gold.

7 – Jack Beresford
Jack Beresford, was a British rower who won five medals at five Olympic Games in succession, an Olympic record in rowing which was not surpassed for 60 years. His record of winning five medals in five consecutive Olympic Games (three gold, two silver), was not beaten until 1996 when Sir Steve Redgrave won his fifth Olympic medal at his fourth Olympic Games (four gold, one bronze).

8 – Jason Kenny
Jason Francis Kenny, OBE is an English track cyclist, specialising in the individual and team sprints.
At the London 2012 Olympic Games Kenny won gold in the team sprint with Chris Hoy and Philip Hindes, setting a new world record in the London Velopark with a time of 42.6 seconds. He also won gold in the men’s sprint final, setting a new Olympic Record in qualifying and avenging his previous losses to Bauge with a 200m time of 10.308s in his final lap.

9 – Henry Taylor
Henry Taylor was an English competitive swimmer who represented Great Britain in four Summer Olympics between 1906 and 1920. His record of three gold medals at one Olympic Games – the most by any Briton – stood for 100 years until it was equalled by cyclist Chris Hoy in 2008.

10 – Reggie Doherty
No tennis player in history has won more Olympic medals than Great Britain’s Reginald Doherty. But he is also remembered for withdrawing from the semi-finals at Paris 1900 to give his brother Laurence a better chance of claiming the singles title.

11 – Richard Meade
Richard Meade, OBE was Britain’s most successful equestrian Olympian. He was a triple Olympic gold medalist and the first British rider to win an individual Olympic title. He also won five World Championship medals, including team golds in 1970 and 1982.
Meade was a member of Britain’s gold medal winning team at both the 1968 and 1972 Summer Olympics, and also won the individual gold in 1972. He also competed in the 1964 and 1976 Olympics, as well as the substitute competition in Fontainbleau during the partial boycott of the 1980 Moscow Olympics.

12 – Charles Smith
Charles Sydney Smith was a British water polo player who competed as winning gold medals in the London games of 1908, the Stockholm games of 1912 and at the Antwerp games in 1920. He was still in the team four years later competing in the Paris games of 1924 where the team was knocked out in the first round by the Hungarian team after extra time.
Smith was chosen to represent the country as the flag bearer at the 1912 Summer Olympics in Stockholm, Sweden. This made him the first competing athlete to carry the flag for Great Britain.

13 – George Wilkinson
George Wilkinson represented Great Britain at the 1900, 1908 and 1912 Olympics as part of the water polo team, winning three gold medals.

14 – Seb Coe
Sebastian Coe, often referred to as Seb Coe or Lord Coe, is a British politician and former track and field athlete. As a middle-distance runner, Coe won four Olympic medals, including the 1500 metres gold medal at the Olympic Games in 1980 and 1984.

15 – Rodney Pattison
Rodney Pattisson, MBE (born 5 August 1943) is an English yachtsman.He is a double Olympic gold medalist in sailing won at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics and 1972 Munich Olympics all in the Flying Dutchman class.

16 – Albert Hill
Albert Hill was a British track and field athlete. He competed at the 1920 Olympics and won gold medals in the 800 m and 1500 m and a silver medal in the 3000 m team race.
Hill started out as a long-distance runner, winning the British AAA championships over 4 miles in 1910.

17 – Frederick Humphreys
Frederick Humphreys was a British tug of war competitor and sport wrestler who competed in the 1908 Summer Olympics in London, in the 1912 Summer Olympics in Stockholm, and in the 1920 Summer Olympics in Antwerp.
He was part of the British City of London Police team which won two gold (1908 and 1920) and one silver medal (1912) in three consecutive tug of war competitions.

18 – Benjamin Jones
Benjamin Jones was a British track cycling racer who competed in the 1908 Summer Olympics.
In 1908 he won the gold medal in the 5000 metres competition as well as in the team pursuit as member of the British team. He also won a silver medal in the 20 kilometres event. He competed in the 660 yards competition but was eliminated in the semi-finals.

19 – Edwin Mills
Edwin Archer Mills was a British tug of war competitor who competed in the 1908 Summer Olympics, in the 1912 Summer Olympics, and in the 1920 Summer Olympics. He was part of the British team City of London Police which won two gold and one silver medal in three consecutive tug of war competitions from 1908 to 1920.

20 – William Pimm
William Pimm was an English sport shooter, who competed in the 1908 Summer Olympics and 1912 Summer Olympics for Great Britain, both games winning coming away with a go

21 – James shepherd
John James Shepherd was an English tug of war competitor who competed in the 1908 Summer Olympics, in the 1912 Summer Olympics, and in the 1920 Summer Olympics for Great Britain.
He was part of the British team City of London Police which won two gold and one silver medal in three consecutive tug of war competitions from 1908 to 1920.

22 – Charles Bennett
Charles Bennett was a British athlete, winner of the 1500 metres at the 1900 Summer Olympics and the first British track and field athlete to become Olympic champion. Together with the combined British/Australian 5000 metres team, Bennett won a second Olympic title. Bennett finished first in the race, with an unofficial world record 15:29.2, beating teammate John Rimmer. His third event was the 4000 m steeplechase, in which he just failed to catch up with the same Rimmer in the final part of the race, settling for second place.

23 – Iain Percy
Percy competed in the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney, where he won a gold medal in the Finn class. He memorably received his gold medal at a ceremony on the steps of the Sydney Opera House.
He competed in the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens and finished 6th in the double-handed Star class with Steve Mitchell. The same team received a bronze medal at the 2005 World Championships and a gold medal at the 2005 European Championships.
At the 2008 Olympics in Beijing he again won a gold medal, this time in the Star class, teaming up with Andrew Simpson. At the 2012 Olympics in London he and Andrew Simpson won the silver medal, after a tight race against Swedish duo Fredrik Lööf and Max Salminen. Percy is a member of Hayling Island Sailing Club and sails there regularly.

24 – Victoria Pendleton
Victoria Pendleton, CBE represented Great Britain and England in international competition, winning nine world titles including a record six in the individual sprint competition, dominating the event between 2005 and 2012. Pendleton is a former Olympic, European and Commonwealth champion. In 2012 she won the gold medal in the keirin at the 2012 Summer Olympics, as well as silver in the sprint.

25 – Rebecca Adlington
Rebecca Adlington was Britain’s first Olympic swimming champion since 1988, and the first British swimmer to win two Olympic gold medals since 1908. She won bronze medals in the women’s 400-metre and 800-metre freestyle events in the 2012 Summer Olympics in London. With four Olympic medals, Adlington shares the record as Great Britain’s most decorated female Olympian with Katherine Grainger.
Adlington represented Great Britain in the 2008 Summer Olympics, competing in the 400-metre freestyle and 800-metre freestyle events. In the heats of the 400-metre freestyle, she broke the Commonwealth record with a time of 4:02.24. On 11 August 2008 she won an Olympic gold medal in the same event, with a time of 4:03.22, beating Katie Hoff of the United States in the last 20 metres. was the first woman to win swimming gold for Great Britain since Anita Lonsbrough in 1960. She was the first British swimmer to win more than one gold medal at a single Olympic Games since Henry Taylor won three in 1908.

26 – Andy Holmes
Andrew J. “Andy” Holmes MBE was a British rower.
He rowed twice in the Olympic Games (in 1984 and 1988) with Sir Steve Redgrave. He was a gold medalist in the Men’s Coxed Fours in 1984 and in the Men’s Coxless Pairs in 1988, when he also took bronze in the coxed pair. He also rowed in the 1986 Commonwealth Games, winning the coxed fours and the coxless pairs.

227 – Hugh Lawrence Doherty
Hugh Laurence “Laurie” Doherty was a British tennis player.
Doherty was a former World No. 1 ranked player. He was a six-time slam champion and a double Olympic Gold medalist at the 1900 Summer Olympics in singles and doubles (also winning a Bronze in mixed doubles).

28 – Kelly Holmes
Dame Kelly Holmes, MBE (Mil), DBE is a retired British middle distance athlete.
Holmes specialised in the 800 metres and 1500 metres events and won a gold medal for both distances at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens. She set British records in numerous events and still holds the records over the 600, 800, 1000, and 1500 metres distances.

29 – Ed Clancy
Edward “Ed” Clancy MBE is an English professional track and road bike racer.
On 17 August 2008, Clancy was a member of the Olympic team pursuit squad which broke the world record in the heats with 3:55:202, beating Russia to the ride-off for silver and gold. The next day, on their way to winning the gold medal, the British team broke their own world record in 3:53:314, beating Denmark by 6.7 seconds.
On 4 April 2012, Clancy was part of the Great Britain team which set a new world record of 3:53.295 in winning the gold medal in the team pursuit at the 2012 World Track Cycling Championships in Melbourne.

30 – Malcolm Cooper
Malcolm Douglas Cooper, MBE, was a British sport shooter. As of 2012, he was the only shooter to win two consecutive gold medals in the Olympic 50 metre rifle three positions event. He won gold medals at the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles and at the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul.

31 – Daley Thompson
Francis Morgan Ayodélé “Daley” Thompson, CBE, is an English former decathlete. He won the decathlon gold medal at the Olympic Games in 1980 and 1984, and broke the world record for the event four times.
Thompson opened the 1980 Olympic season with a world decathlon record of 8,648 points at Götzis, Austria, in May, and followed this with a comfortable win at the Moscow Olympics.
He spent much of the summer of 1984 in California preparing for the defence of his Olympic title, with Jürgen Hingsen. Thompson took the lead in the first event and was never headed throughout the competition, although it seemed that, by easing off in the 1,500 metres he had missed tying the world record by just one point. When the photo-finish pictures were examined, however, it was found that Thompson should have been credited with one more point in the 110 metres hurdles so he had in fact, equalled Hingsen’s record.

32 – Douglas Lowe
Douglas Gordon Arthur Lowe was a British double Olympic Games champion, winning gold medals in 1924 and 1928. On both occasions he set British 800-metres records of 1:52.4 and 1:51.8 respectively, the latter also being an Olympic record.
In the 1924 Summer Olympics in Paris, Lowe won the 800 metres gold medal in a new European record time of 1:52.4. He beat the fellow Cambridge runner Henry Stallard, who had been considered the pre-race favourite. Stallard suffered a leg injury and could only finish fourth. Lowe also came fourth in the 1,500 metres in a time of 3:57.0.

34 – Charles Bugbee
Charles G. Bugbee was a British water polo player who competed in the 1912 Summer Olympics, 1920 Summer Olympics, and in the 1924 Summer Olympics.
He was part of the British team, which was able to win two gold medals. He also participated in the 1924 Olympic water polo tournament, but the British team lost their first round game.

35 – Edith Margaret Hannam
Edith Margaret Hannam was a female tennis player from Great Britain.
At the 1912 Olympics Hannam won the Gold medal in both the Woman’s Singles indoor tournament, beating Danish player Sofie Castenschiold in straight sets, and in the Mixed Doubles indoor tournament with partner Charles Dixon. In 1914 she reached the Woman’s Doubles finals at Wimbledon with partner Ethel Larcombe but lost in straight sets to Elizabeth Ryan and Agnes Morton.

36 – Vivian Woodward
Vivian John Woodward was an English amateur football player who enjoyed the peak of his career from the turn of the 20th century to the outbreak of the First World War.
Woodward was Great Britain captain at the 1908 and 1912 Olympic Games, both of which Great Britain won.

37 – Arthur Berry
Arthur Berry was an English amateur football player who competed in the 1908 and 1912 Summer Olympics. The team was identical to the England national amateur football team, and opinion is divided as to whether it should be referred to as a Great Britain team. In the 1908 tournament he played alongside Kenneth Hunt, who had been his team-mate in the 1907 Varsity football match.

38 – George Thomson Cornet
George Thomson Cornet was the only Scot in the Great Britain and Ireland water polo team that won gold in the 1908 Summer Olympics and the 1912 Summer Olympics.

39 – James Angus Gillan
Sir James Angus Gillan was a Scottish rower and competed in the 1908 Summer Olympics and in the 1912 Summer Olympics.
The Magdalen crew was chosen to represent Great Britain rowing at the 1908 Summer Olympics, and Gillan was in the four with Collier Cudmore, John Somers-Smith and Duncan Mackinnon. The crew won the gold medal for Great Britain and defeated a Leander crew.
In 1909 Gillan joined the Sudan Political Service, but returned on leave in 1911 and as a member of Leander Club and was in the crew that won the Grand Challenge Cup at Henley in 1911. He was home on leave again in 1912 and was member of the British eight which won the gold medal rowing at the 1912 Summer Olympics in Stockholm.

40 – Arthur Wentworth Gore
Gore was a World No. 1 ranked player. He is best known for his two Gold medals at the 1908 Summer Olympics in London, England, winning the Men’s Indoor Singles and the Men’s Indoor Doubles (with Herbert Barrett). He also competed at the 1912 Summer Olympics in Stockholm, Sweden. Gore’s Wimbledon win in 1909, at age 41, makes him the oldest player to date to hold the Wimbledon Gentlemen’s Singles title.

41 – Clarence Kingsbury
Clarence Kingsbury was a British track cyclist who competed in the 1908 Summer Olympics.
In 1908 he won the gold medal in the 20 kilometres competition as well as in the team pursuit as member of the British team.
He finished fifth in the 5000 metres competition and was eliminated in the semi-finals of the 660 yards event. In the sprint event he participated in the final when the time limit was exceeded, resulting in the race being declared void and no medals being awarded.

42 – George Larner
In 1906, Larner took a two-year break from athletics to train for the upcoming 1908 Summer Olympics held in London. After returning, he was disqualified in his first race in April 1908, at the AAA event in walking over seven miles, but the following July he won the two-mile title.
He competed for Great Britain in the 1908 Summer Games in the 3500 metre walk on 14 July 1908, winning the race ahead of fellow Briton Ernest Webb, who took silver, and New Zealander Harry Kerr. Webb had initially taken the lead, but Larner caught up during the second lap and went on to win the race by over twelve seconds. Afterwards he matched this with another gold medal in the 10-mile walk, this time in a British clean sweep, with Webb again winning silver and Edward Spencer winning bronze. Both he and Webb were inside the world record time, with Larner setting world records for both the 9-mile and the 10-mile distances. His final time was 1 hour, 15 minutes and 57.4 seconds. He was one of ten competitors to win more than a single gold medal at the 1908 Games

43 – Bernard Redwood
Bernard Boverton Redwood was a British motorboat racer who competed in the 1908 Summer Olympics. As crew member of the Gyrinus he won two gold medals in the only motor boat competitions at the Olympics. His father was Sir Boverton Redwood, 1st Baronet.

44 – Stanley Shoveller
Stanley Howard Shoveller was a field hockey player, who won a gold medal with the England team at the 1908 Summer Olympics in London. Twelve years later, when Antwerp hosted the 1920 Summer Olympics, he once again captured the gold medal with the Great Britain and Ireland squad, at age 39.

45 – Thomas Thornycroft
Isaac Thomas Thornycroft was an English motorboat racer who competed in the 1908 Summer Olympics representing Great Britain winning two gold medals in the only motor boat competitions included in the Olympics as helmsman of the Gyrinus II, which was designed by his father Sir John Isaac Thornycroft.

46 – John Boland
Boland was the first Olympic champion in tennis for Great Britain and Ireland at the first modern Olympics. Boland promptly won the singles tournament, defeating Friedrich Traun of Germany in the first round, Evangelos Rallis of Greece in the second, Konstantinos Paspatis of Greece in the semifinals, and Dionysios Kasdaglis of Egypt in the final. Boland then entered the doubles event with Traun and won.

47 – Charlotte Cooper
Cooper learned to play tennis at the Ealing Lawn Tennis Club. She won her first senior singles title in 1893 at Ilkley. At the 1900 Summer Olympics in Paris, where women participated for the first time, Cooper won the tennis singles event. On 11 July 1900 she defeated Hélène Prévost in the final in straight sets and became not only the first female Olympic tennis champion but also the first individual female Olympic champion. Together with Reginald Doherty she also won the mixed doubles title after a straight sets victory in the final against Hélène Prévost and Harold Mahony.

48 – John Henry Derbyshire
In the 1900 Olympics Derbyshire was a member of gold medal winning British water polo team. Six years later at Athens he won a bronze medal as a member of British 4×250 metre freestyle relay team and also competed in the 100 metre freestyle and 400 metre freestyle events. Two years later at London he won a gold medal as a member of British 4×200 metre freestyle relay team and was second in his heat of 100 metre freestyle and did not advance.

49 – John Gretton
A noted yachtsman, Gretton won two gold medals in the 1900 Olympic Games. He is unique in winning an Olympic gold medal whilst serving as a member of the House of Commons.

50 – Linton Hope
Linton Chorley Hope was a sailor from Great Britain, who represented Team GB at the 1900 Summer Olympics in Meulan, France.

51 – John Jarvis
John Arthur Jarvis participated in Swimming at the 1900 Summer Olympics in Paris and won two gold medals in the 1000-metre and the 4000-metre freestyle events.

52 – Lorne Currie
Lorne Campbell Currie was a sailor from Great Britain, who represented his country at the 1900 Summer Olympics in Meulan, France. With crew John Gretton, Linton Hope and Algernon Maudslay. Currie, as helmsman, took first place in race of the .5 to 1 ton.

53 – John Rimmer
At the Paris Olympics, Rimmer participated in the 1500 metres competition, where he finished between seventh and ninth place. On the next day, Rimmer won the gruelling 4000 m steeplechase, beating teammate Charles Bennett by one and half yards. Together with Bennett, Alfred Tysoe, Sidney Robinson and Stan Rowley, Rimmer won a second Olympic title in 5000 m team race, finishing second behind Bennett.

54 – Alfred Tysoe
Alfred Ernest Tysoe (21 March 1874 – 26 October 1901) was an English athlete, and winner of two gold medals at the 1900 Olympic Games representing Great Britain.
At the 1900 Olympic Games in Paris, Tysoe was a favourite in the 800m, having just two weeks before the games broken the 880y world record by running 1:57.8. He won easily, beating John Cregan from the United States by 3 yards. He also won a gold medal as part of the British team in the 5000m team race.

55 – Shirley Ann Robertson
Shirley Ann Robertson made it into the history books by becoming the first British woman to win two Olympic gold medals at consecutive games, Sydney 2000 and Athens 2004.
She won her first Olympic gold medal in the Europe class at the 2000 Summer Olympics. In the 2004 Summer Olympics, her crew in the Yngling class clinched the gold medal with one race to spare.

56 – Hugh Edwards
In the 1932 Olympics Edwards won the gold medal in the coxless pairs event with Lewis Clive, and a second gold in the Great Britain coxless four.

57 – James Cracknell
In 1997, Cracknell won a seat in the men’s coxless fours, with Steve Redgrave, Matthew Pinsent and Tim Foster. It was with this crew, that he won his first Olympic gold medal at the 2000 Summer Olympics.
After Redgrave’s retirement, Cracknell swapped from rowing on strokeside to bowside to join Pinsent in the coxless pairs. After a disappointing season in 2003, and Pinsent and Cracknell were shifted into the coxless four, with Steve Williams and Alex Partridge. Ed Coode replaced the injured Partridge in time for the 2004 Summer Olympics and this crew won the gold medal in Athens, beating world champions Canada by 0.08s.

58 – Tom James
Thomas James MBE is a British rower, twice Olympic champion and victorious Cambridge Blue.
James and his crew made the final, securing GB qualification for the Beijing Olympics, and took the bronze behind Canada and Germany.
In March 2008, he was then selected for the GB coxless four along with Andy Triggs-Hodge, Steve Williams and Peter Reed. The GB four dominated their heats and semi finals at the Olympics Beijing. In the final, however, the Australian four led for most of the way. Only a dramatic push by the British boat in the closing stages made the difference; they won the nail-biting final to become gold medallists in a time of 6 minutes 6.57 seconds, beating the Australian four by 1.28 seconds. At the 2012 London Summer Olympic Games, the GB 4 of James and Alex Gregory, Peter Reed and Andrew Triggs-Hodge beat main rivals Australia in the semi-finals, and then repeated their win in the final.

59 – Andrew Triggs Hodge
Andrew Triggs Hodge entered the British rowing scene in 2004.
Following the retirement of Matthew Pinsent, James Cracknell and Ed Coode, a new coxless four was formed with Andrew, his Oxford crewmate Peter Reed, Alex Partridge, and Olympic Champion Steve Williams. Hodge went on to win gold with this crew in Beijing to defend Great Britain’s title in the event.

60 – Steve Williams
Stephen David Williams, OBE is an English rower and double Olympic champion.
With Matthew Pinsent, James Cracknell and Ed Coode, Williams won Olympic gold at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens in the men’s coxless four.

61 – Sarah Ayton
Sarah Lianne Ayton won a gold medal in the Yngling sailing class in the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, together with Shirley Robertson and Sarah Webb, and another gold medal in the Yngling sailing class in the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing, together with Pippa Wilson and Sarah Webb.

62 – Sarah Webb
Sarah Kathleen Webb Gosling is a British professional sailor and twice Olympic gold medalist.
She won a gold medal in the Yngling sailing class in the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, Greece, together with Shirley Robertson and Sarah Ayton, collectively nicknamed “Three Blondes in a Boat.” She repeated this success in the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing, China, together with Pippa Wilson and Sarah Ayton.

63 – Geraint Thomas
Geraint Howell Thomas has enjoyed success both on the track and on the road
On 17 August 2012 Thomas was a member of the Olympic team pursuit squad which broke the world record in the heats with a time of 3:55.202. The following day, on their way to winning the gold medal, the British Team pursuit broke their own world record in a time of 3:53.314!

64 – Mo Farah
Mohamed Farah mostly competes over 5000 metres and 10,000 metres, but has run competitively from 1500 metres to the marathon. He was a gold medallist in the 5000 m and 10,000 m at the 2012 Summer Olympics. He was the second man in history to win long-distance doubles at successive Olympics and World Championships, and the first in history to do the triple-double.
At the London 2012 Olympics, Farah won the 10,000 m gold in a time of 27:30.42. This was Great Britain’s first Olympic gold medal in the 10,000 m, and came after two other gold medals for the country in the same athletics session. On 11 August 2012, Farah made it a long-distance double, winning the 5000 metres in a time of 13:41.66. He dedicated the two golds to his twin daughters.

65 – Pete Reed
Peter Reed is a two-times Olympic gold medallist – earning gold in the Men’s coxless four at the 2008 Beijing Olympics and the 2012 Summer Olympics in London and has won five gold medals and three silver medals at the World Championships.
Reed represented Great Britain at the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing. The GB four dominated their heats and semi-finals at the Beijing Olympics. In the final, however, the Australian four lead for most of the way. Only a dramatic push by the British boat in the closing stages made the difference; they won the nail biting final to become gold medallists in a time of 6 minutes 6.57 seconds, beating the Australian four by 1.28 seconds.
Reed confirmed on 6 November 2008 that he had been given permission to continue training for the 2012 Summer Olympics in London. At the 2012 Summer Games, Reed, along with Triggs-Hodge, James and Alex Gregory, helped Great Britain retain the gold medal in the men’s coxless four.

66 – Laura Trott
Laura Trott, OBE is an English track and road cyclist who specialises in the team pursuit, omnium and scratch race disciplines. She is the inaugural Olympic champion in both events.
Representing Great Britain, Trott is the reigning Olympic and European champion in both events and reigning world champion in the omnium, as well as four-times a world champion in the team pursuit, and the reigning world and European champion in the scratch race. She is the most successful rider, male or female, in the history of the European Track Championships, with ten titles as of October 2015.
At the 2012 Summer Olympics, Trott won a gold medal in the team pursuit alongside Dani King and Joanna Rowsell. The team also set a new world record time of 3:14.051 in this event. Including pre-Olympics races and the Olympics final itself, in the six times they had ridden together they had broken the world record in every race.

67 – Charlotte Dujardin
Charlotte Dujardin OBE is an elite British dressage rider. The most successful British dressage rider in the history of the sport and the winner of all major titles and world records in the sport, Dujardin has been described as the most dominant dressage rider of her era.
Riding Valegro, Dujardin currently holds the complete set of the available individual elite dressage titles; the individual Olympic freestyle, World freestyle and Grand Prix Special, World Cup individual dressage and European freestyle and Grand Prix Special titles. Dujardin is the first, and to date only, rider to hold this complete set of titles at the same time.
In addition, she forms part of the current Great Britain team for Team Dressage; as such she is also the current Olympic, and a former European, Team Dressage champion.
In 2015, Charlotte became Global Ambassador for the Brooke Hospital for Animals – an equine welfare charity that focuses on improving the lives of working horses, donkeys and mules in 11 countries around the world. It is her first official charity partnership.

68 – Katherine Grainger
Katherine Grainger CBE is a British rower, 2012 Summer Olympics gold medallist, three-time Olympic silver medalist and six-time World Champion.
Grainger first won silver at the Sydney Olympics in 2000 in the woman’s Quadruple Sculls. In Athens in 2004 she won silver in the coxless pairs. In Beijing 2008 she won her third silver, again in the Quadruple Sculls.
At the London Olympics 2012, Anna Watkins and Grainger broke the Olympic record as they qualified for the Double Sculls final. They then went on to win the gold medal. With four Olympic medals, Grainger shares the record as Great Britain’s most decorated female Olympian with Rebecca Adlington.

69 – Kitty McKane
Kathleen “Kitty” McKane Godfree was a British tennis and badminton player, winning five Olympic medals in tennis at the 1920 Antwerp and 1924 Paris games, the most Olympic medals ever won by a tennis player.

70 – David Wilkie
David Andrew Wilkie, MBE is a Scottish former competitive swimmer who was Olympic and Commonwealth Games champion in the 1970s. He is the only person to have held British, American, Commonwealth, European, world and Olympic swimming titles at the same time and was the first British swimmer to win an Olympic gold medal since Anita Lonsborough in 1960.
Wilkie’s world breakthrough came when he won silver in the 200-metre breaststroke at the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, Germany, in a European record time in spite of being ranked only 25th in the world. He also broke the Scottish record times for the 100-metre breaststroke and the 200-metre individual medley.

71 – Cyril Mackworth Praed
Cyril Winthrop Mackworth-Praed was a British sport shooter who competed in the 1924 Summer Olympics.
In 1924 he won the gold medal as member of the British team in the team running deer, double shots event. He also won two silver medals in the running deer, single shots and double shots competition.

72 – Harry Robinson Humby
Harold Robinson Humby was a British sport shooter, who competed at the 1908, 1912 and 1920 Summer Olympics.
In the 1908 Olympics he won a gold medal in the team small-bore rifle event, silver medal in the stationary target small-bore rifle event and was eighth in the disappearing target small-bore rifle event. Four years later he won a silver medal in the team clay pigeons event and was fourth in individual trap event.

73 – Linford Christie
Linford Cicero Christie is the only British man to have won gold medals in the 100 metres at all four major competitions open to British athletes: The Olympic Games, the World Championships, the European Championships and the Commonwealth Games.
Christie’s early track career was not promising. He failed to make the Great Britain team for the 1984 Summer Olympics. It was not until he began to work in earnest under the coaching of Ron Roddan that he began to fulfil his potential.
At the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, Christie won the 100m silver behind Carl Lewis after Ben Johnson, who set a world record in 9.79 seconds, was disqualified following a positive drug test for anabolic steroids, but later withdrew his participation to avoid the publication of his drug test.
In 1992, Christie became the third British athlete to win the Olympic 100m, after Harold Abrahams and Allan Wells, winning the title ahead of Frankie Fredericks of Namibia at the Barcelona Olympic Games.
In the absence of his great rival Lewis, Christie ran 9.96 s in the final, and at the age of 32 years 121 days became the oldest Olympic 100m champion by four years 38 days.

 

 

 

 

 

74 – Leslie Law
Leslie Law is a British eventer was a member of the British team that won silver at the 2000 Olympic Games and bronze at the 2002 World Equestrian Games.
But their greatest success was at the 2004 Olympics. Tenth after the dressage section, an excellent cross country still left him out of the medals, an inspired clear round in the show jumping saw him awarded the silver medal. However, amid much controversy the result was appealed, as video evidence showed that the gold medalist, German rider Bettina Hoy, had crossed the start line twice, and thus incurred twelve penalty points. By the time the Court of Arbitration for Sport ruled against Hoy, promoting Law to the gold, he had returned to England and heard the news that he was Olympic Champion while competing in the Solihull Horse Trials.

75 – Guy Butler
Guy Montagu Butler was a British sprinter, winner of the gold medal in the 4 × 400m relay at the 1920 Summer Olympics.
At the Antwerp Olympics in 1920, Butler won the silver medal in the individual 400m and anchored the British 4 × 400m relay team to a gold medal in 3:22.2.
At the 1924 Summer Olympics, he won bronze in the 400m and again anchored the British 4 × 400m relay team, this time winning bronze in 3:17.4. In 1928 he became the first British track and field athlete to compete in three Olympics; he reached a 200 m quarterfinal, and retired shortly thereafter.

76 – Charles Percy Dixon
Charles Percy Dixon was a male tennis player from Great Britain. He was a four-time Olympic medallist and led a successful British team to victory in the Davis Cup.

77 – Mary Rand
In the 1960 Olympics in Rome, Mary Denise Rand set a British record of 6.33m in the qualifying round of the long jump, which if repeated, would have won a silver in the final. In the final she fouled two of the three jumps and finished ninth. She also finished fourth in the 80m hurdles.
At the 1964 Olympics in Tokyo, Rand set an Olympic record in the long jump in the qualifying rounds, jumping 6.52m. In the final she beat the favourite, world record holder Tatyana Schelkanova of the USSR and Poland’s Irena Kirszenstein. Her first jump of 6.59m was a British record. However, in the fifth round, on a wet runway with a headwind of 1.6 metres a second, she broke the world record, leaping 6.76m to take gold. Her record lasted four years until it was broken at altitude by Viorica Viscopoleanu in the subsequent Olympics.
Rand won silver medal in the pentathlon, her 5035 points putting her second in the all-time rankings. She was beaten to the gold by Irina Press, whose biological sex has been the subject of speculation. She also won a bronze as a member of the Great Britain team that finished third in the 4×100 metres relay.

78 – David Hemery
At the Mexico City Olympics in 1968, David Peter Hemery won the 400m hurdles in 48.12 seconds, a new world record. His margin of victory was the largest since the 1924, beating second-placed Gerhard Hennige from West Germany by almost a second. BBC coverage of the race is notorious for the words of the commentator David Coleman, shortly after Hemery crossed the line: “who cares who’s third – it doesn’t matter!” Hemery’s British teammate John Sherwood turned out to be the bronze medal winner in a close finish that had to be settled by photo finish. It was an early example of so-called Colemanballs.

79 – Alexander Maunder
Alexander Elsdon Maunder was a British sport shooter who competed at the 1908 Summer Olympics and the 1912 Summer Olympics.
In the 1908 Olympics, he won a gold medal in team trap shooting and a bronze medal in individual trap shooting. Four years later, he won a silver medal in the team clay pigeons event and was 45th in the trap event.

80 – Josiah George Ritchie
Major Josiah George Ritchie was a male tennis player from Great Britain.
At the 1908 London Olympics Games he won a Gold (Men’s Singles), Silver (Men’s Doubles) and Bronze (Men’s Indoor Singles) medal. He remained the last British player to win an Olympic medal in singles until Andy Murray won Gold in the 2012 games, also in London.

81 – Sidney Robinson
Sidney John Robinson was an early twentieth century English middle-distance athlete who specialised in the steeplechase.
He participated at the 1900 Summer Olympics in Paris for the United Kingdom and won three medals, the silver medal in the 2500 metre event and a bronze medal in the 4000 metres steeplechase. He also won the gold medal in the 5000 metres team race as part of a mixed team with Charles Bennett, John Rimmer, Alfred Tysoe and Stan Rowley.

82 – Paul Manning
Paul Christian Manning is a former English professional track and road cyclist who rode for the UCI Professional Continental team Landbouwkrediet-Tönissteiner in 2007 and 2008.
On 17 August 2008, Manning was a member of the Olympic team pursuit squad which broke the world record in the heats with a time of 3:55:202. The following day, on their way to winning the gold medal, the British Team pursuit broke their own world record in a time of 3:53:314, beating their Danish competitors by 6.7 seconds.
In 2009, he was inducted into the British Cycling Hall of Fame.

83 – Ann Packer
Ann Elizabeth Packer is an English former sprinter, hurdler and long jumper. She won a gold medal in the 800 metres and a silver in the 400 metres at the 1964 Summer Olympics.
When she was selected for the 1964 British Olympic team Packer worked as a PE teacher at Coombe County Girls’ School. Packer was hoping to win the 400 metres, but was beaten into second place by Betty Cuthbert of Australia, despite setting a new European record at 52.20 seconds. Disappointed, Packer planned to skip the 800m event and had a shopping trip instead, until her fiancé, Robbie Brightwell convinced her to compete. Before the Olympics, Packer only had five domestic 800m races; she had taken up a longer distance to improve her stamina, and earned the third British spot at the last minute.
In her heat and semi-final Packer finished fifth and third, and therefore started the final the slowest of the eight contestants, having raced at the distance only seven times before. Packer was sixth at 400m, using her sprinting speed to take the gold. She broke the world record with a time of 2:01.1 minutes infancy and the 800m had only been run in Rome four years earlier for the first time.
After winning the gold medal, she announced her retirement at the age of 22 and so had one of the shortest athletics careers of any Olympic gold medallist. It would be another forty years before another British woman, Kelly Holmes, would win the 800m, despite British men being successful at the distance.

84 – Derek Allhusen
Major Derek Swithin Allhusen was an English equestrian who returned to Britain after the way where he brought back two horses with him and settled in Claxton, Norfolk. He rode one of the horses, Laura when representing Britain in the pentathlon at the 1948 Winter Olympic Games. He eventually took up eventing in 1955, riding Laura’s daughter Laurien on two European Championship teams, winning a team gold medal in 1957, then team silver and individual bronze in 1959. In 1961 he bought Irish-bred Lochinvar and rode her in two winning European Championship teams (in 1967 and 1969) as well as the gold and silver at the 1968 Summer Olympics.

85 – Mark Phillips
Captain Mark Anthony Peter Phillips is a horseman for Great Britain and former husband of Anne, Princess Royal, with whom he had two children.
Phillips was a reserve member of the British equestrian team for the 1968 Olympics. He was part of the British three-day event teams that won a world title in 1970 and Olympic gold medals in 1972; individually he finished in 35th place in 1972. At the 1988 Olympics his horse sustained a pulled muscle and could not complete the individual three-day event, but Phillips won a silver medal with the British team. It was through his equestrian activities that he met Princess Anne, the only daughter of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. Their daughter Zara won a silver medal in the three-day event with the British team in 2012.

86 – Allan Wells
Allan Wipper Wells MBE is a former British track and field sprinter who became the 100 metres Olympic champion at the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow.
At the start of the 1980 season, Wells won the AAA’s 100 metres, then went to the Côte d’Azur to finish preparing for the 1980 Moscow Olympic Games. Wells never used starting blocks, until a rule change forced him to do so for the Moscow Olympics. Wells qualified for the final, with a new British record of 10.11s, where he faced pre-race favourite Silvio Leonard of Cuba. By 60m the field were fading, and by 80m the race was between Leonard on the inside and Wells on the outside. Wells edged ahead, but Leonard drew even again. With seven metres to go Wells began an extreme lean which allowed his head and shoulder to cross the finish line 3 inches (76 mm) before Leonard’s chest in a photo finish; both men were given a final time of 10.25s. Wells became the oldest Olympic 100m champion at that time at the age of 28 years 83 days. He remains the last white male athlete to win the Olympic 100 metres title.
The 200m final was another close affair. Wells from lane 7, exploded out of the blocks and ran a spectacular turn making up the stagger on Mennea to his outside after only 50 metres. Coming out of the turn he had a two-metre lead over Leonard, with Quarrie close behind in third while Mennea looking fully eclipsed. But Mennea shifted gears in the straight and caught Wells with 10 metres to go. Wells attempted a final dip which had brought him victory in the 100, but he fell short, and Wells won the silver medal behind Pietro Mennea, who beat him by 0.02s; again he set a British record of 20.21 s. He went on to break a third British record, 38.62 s, with the sprint relay team that finished fourth in the final.

87 – John Badcock
John Charles Badcock, also known as Felix Badcock, was a British rower who competed in the 1928 Summer Olympics and in the 1932 Summer Olympics.
In 1928 he was in the winning Thames crews in the Grand and Stewards at Henley. The Thames eight was then chosen to represent Great Britain rowing at the 1928 Summer Olympics and won the silver medal.

88 – Harold Abrahams
Harold Maurice Abrahams, was an English track and field athlete. He was Olympic champion in 1924 in the 100 metres sprint, a feat depicted in the 1981 movie Chariots of Fire.
Although Abrahams dominated British long jump and sprint events, he employed Sam Mussabini, a professional coach, who improved his style and training techniques in preparation for the 1924 Olympics in Paris, France.
One month before the 1924 Games, he set the English record in the long jump 24 feet 2 1⁄2 inches (7.38 m), a record which stood for the next 32 years.
At the 1924 Summer Games, Abrahams won the 100 m in a time of 10.6 seconds. The Paris Olympics 100 m dash took place at 7 pm, and Abrahams and Porritt dined together at 7 pm on 7 July every year thereafter, until Abrahams’s death in 1978.

89 – Maxwell Woosnam
Maxwell “Max” Woosnam was an English sportsman who is sometimes referred to as the ‘Greatest British sportsman’ in recognition of his achievements.
Among his achievements were winning an Olympic gold and silver in tennis at the 1920 Summer Olympics, winning the doubles at Wimbledon, compiling a 147 break in Snooker, making a century at Lord’s Cricket Ground, captaining the British Davis Cup team, captaining Manchester City F.C. finishing ultimately runners-up for the Football League Championship in 1920–21 and captaining the England national football team.

90 John – Sewell
John Sewell was a Scottish tug of war competitor who competed for Great Britain and Ireland in the 1912 Summer Olympics and in the 1920 Summer Olympics. In 1912 he won the silver medal as part of the City of London Police team. Eight years later he won the gold medal as member of the Great Britain team.

91 – Sidney Swann
At Cambridge Sidney Ernest Swann won the Colquhoun Sculls in and was in the winning crew in the Visitors’ Challenge Cup and Wyfolds Henley Royal Regatta, also in 1910. On 12 September 1911 Swann set the record for rowing across the English Channel in a single with a row of 3 hours and 50 minutes. Swann was a member of Leander Club and was the sole Cambridge man in the Leander eight which won the gold medal for Great Britain rowing at the 1912 Summer Olympics. Swann later rowed in the Leander boat which won the Silver Medal for Great Britain rowing at the 1920 Summer Olympics.

92 – Ewart Horsfall
Ewart Douglas Horsfall arrived at Oxford with an outstanding reputation as a rower and in 1912 was in the winning Oxford boat in the Boat Race. He joined Leander Club and was a member of the Leander eight which won the gold medal for Great Britain rowing at the 1912 Summer Olympics.
After the war, he returned to Oxford to help re-establish rowing at the University. He was strokeman of the Leander eight which won the silver medal for Great Britain rowing at the 1920 Summer Olympics, coming within half a length of winning.

93 – Joseph Pepe
Joseph Pepé won the gold medal in the small-bore rifle, prone, 50 metres team event at the 1912 Olympics along with team-mates William Pimm, Edward Lessimore and Bob Murray. Pimm was also in the team with Pepé that won the disappearing target silver medal at the same Games.

94 – Harold Wilson
Harold Wilson competed at the 1908 Summer Olympics in London and won a team gold in the 3 mile and an individual silver in the 1500 metres race.
At the 1908 Olympics, Wilson won his 1500 m semi-final in a time of 4:11.4; his time in the final was 4:03.6, fractions of a second behind Melvin Sheppard. He was also part of Britain’s five-man gold medal-winning team in the three-mile race.

95 – John Wodehouse
John Wodehouse holds the unique distinction of being the only person to win a Gold Medal at the Olympics in 1920 and a Silver Medal in 1908, both for polo.

96 – Herbert Roper Barrett
At the London Olympics in 1908 Barrett won a gold medal in the men’s indoor doubles event with Arthur Gore. They also won the doubles in Wimbledon in 1909. In 1912 and 1913 he won the Wimbledon doubles title with Charles Dixon.

97 – George Frederick De Relwyskow
Relwyskow took up wrestling as a means of keeping fit while a student in London. By 1907 he had won thirty-five open competitions in Great Britain. Because of his success he selected to represent Great Britain in the 1908 Olympics held in London, where he won a gold in lightweight and silver in middleweight.

98 – John Reginald Keith Fenning
John partnered fellow rower Gordon Thomson at bow in the coxless pairs to win the gold medal for Great Britain at the 1908 Summer Olympics. Later in the same afternoon he and Thomson were in the Leander coxless four with Philip Filleul and Harold Barker which won a silver medal.

99 – Michael K Matthews
Michael Matthews competed at London 1908 winning silver in 25y Small Bore Rifle, Moving Target and gold in the team 50+100y Small Bore Rifle.

100 – Leon Meredith
Meredith became an Olympic gold medallist in the 1908 London Olympic Games, on the 660-yard track at White City. He rode in the team pursuit with Ernie Payne, Ben Jones and Clarence Kingsbury. It was the first time the event had been held in the Olympic Games. In the tandem race he was eliminated in the semi-final. He reached the final of the 20 km race but did not finish.
He was part of the team which won the silver medal in the Team road race. In the individual road race he finished fourth.

101 – Charles Palmer
Charles Palmer was an English sport shooter who competed at the 1908, 1912 and 1920 Summer Olympics. In the 1908 Olympics he won a gold medal in the team trap shooting event. Four years later, he won a silver medal in the team clay pigeons event.

102 – Arthur James Robertson
Arthur James Robertson was a Scottish runner who competed at the 1908 Summer Olympics in London. He won the gold medal in the 3-mile team race and a silver in the steeplechase.

103 – William Styles
In the 1908 Olympics William Kensett Styles won a gold medal in the disappearing target small-bore rifle, and was 9th in the moving target small-bore rifle event.
Four years later, he won a silver medal in the 25 metre team small-bore rifle event, was 13th in the 25 metre small-bore rifle event and 27th in the 50 metre rifle from the prone position event.

104 – Gordon Thomson
In the 1908 Summer Olympics, Thomson partnered John Fenning in the coxless pairs to win the gold medal for Great Britain. Later in the same afternoon he and Fenning were in the Leander coxless four with Philip Filleul and Harold Barker which won a silver medal, losing to the Magdalen College, Oxford crew.

105 – Launceston Elliott
At 21 years old, Elliot travelled to Athens for the first modern Olympic Games. The two-handed lift came first on the program with Elliot lifting 111.5 kilograms. Later, in the one-handed lift, Elliot raised 71.0 kilograms without difficulty and became Britain’s first Olympic champion.

106 – Jonathan Edwards
In 1996 Edwards went into the Olympic Games as favourite and world record holder, but walked away with the silver. Edwards later won the gold medal at the 2000 Olympic Games, and was appointed a CBE shortly afterwards.
During his commentary for the 2008 Summer Olympics, Edwards observed that during the 1995 World Championships, he felt as if “he could jump as far as he needed to”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

107 Godfrey Brown
Arthur Godfrey Kilner Brown was narrowly beaten by Archie Williams in the 400 m individual event at the Berlin Olympics, but anchored the British 4 × 400 m relay team to a gold medal ahead of the United States.

108 – Godfrey Rampling
At the 1932 Summer Olympics, Rampling was fourth in his semi-final in the individual 400 metre event and didn’t reach the final, but ran the anchor leg to help the British 4 × 400 m relay team win the silver medal.
At the 1936 Berlin Olympics, Rampling was again fourth in the semi-finals of 400 metre competition and ran the second leg in the gold medal winning British 4 × 400 m relay team.

109 – Thomas Hampson
Hampson didn’t take up running seriously until the last year of his studies at Oxford University.
At the 1932 Olympics in Los Angeles Hampson fought off Canadian Alex Wilson to break the tape in 1.49.7, a new world record and becoming the first ever man to run 800 metres in under 1 minutes and 50 seconds. He got his second Olympic medal as part of the British 4 × 400 metres relay team.

110 – David George Burghley
Burghley made his Olympic debut in Paris in 1924, when he was eliminated in the first round of the 110 metre hurdles event. At the 1928 Summer Olympics, Burghley was eliminated in the semifinal of the 110 metre hurdles competition, but won the 400 m hurdles by 0.2 seconds.

111 – Darren Campbell
At the 2000 Olympics in Sydney, Campbell placed 6th in the 100 m final, and took a surprise silver medal in the 200m, as Campbell was mainly a 100m runner, and had a previous best time of 20.49sec. In the quarter-final, he took 0.29sec off this to reduce to 20.13sec, his fastest time at the distance in his career. This was followed by performances of 20.23sec in the semi-final and 20.14sec in the final to finish second, Campbell’s first senior medal at the distance.

In the 2004 Olympics, Campbell won a gold medal in the 4 x 100 m, in a team with Jason Gardener, Marlon Devonish and Mark Lewis-Francis, who defeated the United States team by just 0.01sec, winning in a season’s best of 38.07sec.

112 – Jason Queally
Jason Queally hit the headlines in September 2000 when he won Great Britain’s first gold medal in the Sydney Olympics, setting a new Games record on his way to victory in the 1km time trial.

113 – Christine Ohuruogu
In 2008 in Beijing Christine became the first ever British female 400m champion, by beating the pre-race favourite Sanya Richards and Shericka Williams, with a time of 49.62s.
Ohuruogu won the silver medal at 400m in the 2012 London Olympics. In a close race Sanya Richards Ross held on to take the gold while Ohuruogu produced a fast finish to beat DeeDee Trotter and Amantle Montsho by just a few hundredths of a second to take the Silver.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

114 – Mark Hunter
In 2007 Hunter partnered Zac Purchase dominated the lightweight event, winning all of their races, and finishing the season as 2008 Olympic champions. They then went on to win Silver at London 2012.

115 – Rebecca Romero
Romero has won world championships in both cycling and rowing. As a rower, she won a silver medal at the Athens 2004 Olympics in the quadruple sculls.

116 – Andrew Simpson
Simpson partnered up with lifelong friend Percy and won the gold medal in Beijing 2008 in the Star class.
They competed at the 2012 Olympic Games, again in the Star class, failing to defend their title despite being in the lead throughout the competition, but winning the silver medal.

117 – Zac Purchase
In 2008 Zac and his partner dominated the lightweight event, winning all of their races, and finishing the season as Olympic champions in Beijing, setting a new Olympic Record.
Purchase was appointed Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) in the 2009 New Year Honours for services to sport and collected his award in June of that year.

118 – Andy Murray
Andy Murray OBE is currently ranked Singles World No. 2.
Murray is the reigning Olympic champion, having defeated Roger Federer at the 2012 Olympic Games in straight sets to win the gold medal in the men’s singles final, becoming the first British singles champion in over 100 years. He also won a silver medal in the mixed doubles, playing with Laura Robson.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

119 – Greg Searle
Greg Searle won an Olympic gold medal, winning the coxed pairs event at the 1992 Barcelona Olympics. He was a finalist in the men’s pair at the 2000 Sydney Olympics with Ed Coode, finishing a disappointing and close fourth, having led much of the way. He returned to international rowing at the age of and won an Olympic bronze medal, age 40, in the men’s eight at London 2012.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

120 – Tim Brabants
Jules Timothy Brabants MBE is a British sprint kayaker who has competed since the late 1990s. Competing in four Olympic games, he has won three medals with one gold and two bronzes.

121 – Harry Llewellyn
In 1987, after a long search, Harry bought his horse, Foxhunter. The duo then went on to win a bronze medal at the 1948 Summer Olympics. They soon captured the public imagination in 1952 by winning Great Britain’s only gold Olympic medal in Helsinki.
After Harry Llewellyn’s death, his ashes were scattered near Foxhunter’s grave and memorial on the Blorenge mountain above Abergavenny.

122 – Wilfred White
Wilfred was an equestrian Olympic champion. He won a gold medal in show jumping with the British team at the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki, and later won a bronze medal at the1956 Stockholm Olympics.

123 – Frank Weldon
Francis William Weldon was a British equestrian and Olympic champion. He won a team gold medal in eventing at the 1956 Summer Olympics in Stockholm, and received an individual bronze medal.

124 – Richard McTaggart
Affectionately known as Dick McTaggart, he competed in the 1956 and 1960 Olympics in the lightweight division and won a gold and a bronze medal, respectively. Later in the 1964 Olympics McTaggart moved to light-welterweight category, but lost in the third bout to the eventual winner Jerzy Kulej.

131 – 125 Kulbir Bhaura, Richard Leman, Richard Dodds, Jonathan Potter, Paul Barber, Beryan Pappin, Ian Taylor
These gentleman made up the Great Britain field hockey Olympic team. Their first medal came at the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics where they secured a bronze medal. Four years later, at the 1988 Olympics in Seoul they won the gold medal.

132 – Martin Cross
Martin Cross won gold in the coxed four at both the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics 1980 Moscow Olympics.

133 – Duncan Goodhew
After swimming competitively in America as a collegian at North Carolina State University, Duncan Goodhew swam for Great Britain and won Olympic gold and bronze medals at the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow.

134 – Steve Ovett
Steve Ovett was the stand out favourite for the 1500m going in to the 1980 Moscow Olympics, as he was previously unbeaten over 1500m and a mile for the previous three years.
This Olympics marked only the second time that Ovett & Seb Coe had met each other in an international competition, which brought huge media speculation over which would emerge as the greater.
In the 800 m final, Ovett was in sixth place halfway, but pushed his way through the crowd to second place. Seventy metres from the finish, he shot into the lead and held off Coe to win by three metres.
Here he is winning that gold medal:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

135 – Eric Lidell
During the1924 Paris Olympics, Liddell received the bronze medal in the 200 metre final.
Later, on July 11th, Eric competed in the 400 metre race. Liddell raced the whole of the first 200 metres to be well clear of the favoured Americans. With little option but to then treat the race as a complete sprint, he continued to race round the final bend. He was challenged all the way down the home straight but held on to take the win. He broke the Olympic and world records with a time of 47.6 seconds. It was controversially ratified as a world record, despite it being 0.2 seconds slower than the record for the greater distance of 440 yards.

136 – Frederick Barrett
Frederick was a British international polo player, winning a gold in 1920 and bronze in 1924.

137 – Harry Ryan
Harry Ryan steered himself and his British partner to victory in the tandem event at the 1920 Olympics and also won a bronze medal in the 1,000 metre match sprint.

138 – William Applegarth
William Applegarth was a British track and field athlete, winner of gold medal in 4 × 100 metres relay at the 1912 Olympics.

139 – Jennie Fletcher
In 1905 Jennie Fletcher set a new world record in the 100-yard freestyle that stood for seven years. She was selected for the 1908 Olympics, but the women’s swimming events were cancelled due to a shortage of participants. At the 1912 Olympics, she won a gold medal in the 4×100-metre freestyle relay and a bronze medal in the individual 100-metre freestyle race.

140 – Edward Amoore
Edward Amoore represented Great Britain in sport shooting at the 1908 Olympics, where he won a gold medal in the team small-bore rifle event and bronze in the disappearing target small-bore rifle event.

141 – John Astor
John Astor represented Great Britain in rackets at the 1908 Olympics, winning the gold medal in the men’s doubles competition together with Vane Pennell, and winning bronze in the men’s singles event.

142 – Edward Barrett
Edward Edmond “Ned” Barrett was a track and field athlete, wrestler and hurler.
Barrett’s gold medal was awarded to him at the 1908 London Olympics as part of the City of London Police tug-of-war team. Yes, tug-of-war used to be an Olympic sport!
He also won a bronze medal in the heavyweight division of the freestyle wrestling competition.

143 – William Foster
William Foster swam for Great Britain in the 1908 and 1912 Olympics.
At the 1908 London Olympics, he won the gold medal as part of the British 4×200-metre freestyle relay team and did not compete in any other competition.
Four years later at the 1912 Olympics in Stockholm, he won the bronze medal as part of the British 4×200-metre freestyle relay team.

144 – Norman Hallows
Norman Hallows was a middle-distance runner, winning the bronze medal whilst setting an Olympic record in the 1500 metres race at the 1908 London Olympics. His time in the first round was 4:03.4, beating the Olympic record set by American Mel Sheppard only minutes earlier by 1.6 seconds. In the final, Sheppard matched Hallows’ first round time while Hallows finished in third place at 4:04.0.

145 – Evan Noel
Evan Baillie Noel was an rackets player who represented Britain in the 1908 London Olympics, where he won the gold medal in the men’s singles event. In the men’s doubles competition he won the bronze medal together with Henry Leaf.

146 – Madge Syers
Florence Madeline “Madge” Syers was a British figure skater. Before she retired in 1908, Syers was the first woman to compete at the World Figure Skating Championships and won the silver medal. In the 1908 London Olympics, the first Olympic Games to include figure skating, she competed as a pair’s skater with her husband Edgar Syers, and won the bronze medal as well as a gold in the individual women’s figure skate.

147 – Peter Kemp
Peter Kemp competed for Great Britain in swimming and water polo in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. At the 1900 Olympics in Paris, he won a bronze medal in the 200-metre obstacle event, and a gold medal in water polo.

148 – Stephen Batchelor
Alongside wining the Hockey World Cup in 1986, Stephen Batchelor won a gold and a bronze medal for Great Britain in the 1988 and 1984 Olympics as a key member of the men’s hockey team.
After these amazing achievements, Stephen went on to coach to U14 boys, helping them to experience the great sport.

149 – Chris Boardman
Chris represented Great Britain both on the road and on the track at four Olympic games; 1988, 1992, 1996 and 2000 winning a bronze medal on the road in the individual time trial and later in 1992 in Barcelona for his individual pursuit in a time of 4:27.357
Now known for his range of bikes and the face of the Tour de France, Chris Boardman is still a household name.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

150 – Tim Foster
Tim competed for Great Britain in the 1992, 1996 and 2000 Olympics, winning a bronze medal in Atlanta in 1996, and a gold medal in 2000 in Sydney, both in Rowing, Four Without Coxswain. After the amazing achievement in Sydney, Foster was awarded an MBE in 2001.
Not only did Tim achieve his two Olympic medals during his career, he also has seven World Rowing Championships medals, of which two are gold to show off.

How many did you get right? Let us know on Facebook or Twitter.

shop now

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.